Saturday, April 16, 2016

The Dragonfly Fighter Furtheration.

 

 

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Then I made a cover for the joystick.

I took a hex bolt and then formed to copper over it until I got a shape like that.

The feet will still be worked and engraved on further toward finishing time.

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And I made the various levers and controls to be able to fly this machine.

There’s more to come.

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Starting the middle arms.

I take 4 mm brass rod and carve it with a big ass flame tungsten carbide burr.

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Rough carving directly into the metal.

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I get tired quickly of what I make.

I got tired of the first head, so I made another.

I carved it out of a thicker piece of brass.

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I made a yaw control lever out of titanium.

You can see the tapped mounting hole at the bottom.

Tapping titanium is wonderful.....

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I heat blued and installed the yaw lever for one of the middle arms.

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And then I also made a vertical indicator.

I hung a temporary piece of turquoise on it.

I will replace that with a dark garnet bead when I find the fuckers. They AWOL.

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I made his eyes out of titanium.

They just been stuck in with putty.

Later I'll mark the pupil area and then rivet the titanium with a ball of gold there.

I need an aggressive and intelligent look.

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Then I had to add the methane/ hydrogen sulfide vent pipes that the alien pilot needs to operate at 100% efficiency.

The gauge has not been commissioned yet, and needs careful calibration, because the mix of gasses is quite critical.

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Here I am.

The pilot with the cockpit open.

I made it so that the entire cockpit is removable so that everyone can see the alien pilot in his full splendor.

I’m going to do the rear feet again.

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Cockpit closed.

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Other side.

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Don’t fuck with Joe.

Sunday, March 27, 2016

More Dragonfly Fighter.

 

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So cut a whole lot of slats out on the top.

Gotta be brutal with your own designs.

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Then I cut the glass for the cockpit.

I use 1.2 mm glass taken from a picture frame.

Good source of thin glass sheeting and not expensive either.

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Once the are cut to size, then I drill a 3 mm hole through each one and it is then bolted in place with a placer screw.

(placer screw = screw that holds things in place during construction).

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There were 18 pieces of glass and they were more that a little bit of work to get them all nicely behaved.

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Then I etched a design into the floor pan of the cockpit.

I used the Edinburgh etch system.

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It came out OK and then I added a copper surround with bubble rivets for decoration.

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Now to make the alien pilot.

I made a temporary body, so that I can get a feel for the size.

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Then I start with the head.

I decided to carve directly into metal, as apposed to wax casting.

So I start with a 10 mm brass rod that i turn and rough out.

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I had to solder it back onto a rod to hold it easier.

You learn, and anyway, now the metal was annealed.

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Frickin' thing looks like a duck.

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Getting there.

This is the blank.

I will add more detail later in the project like titanium eyes and more attitude.

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I finished the temp body and started working on the arms.

I want the pilot to be flying the Dragonfly Fighter in a banking curve.

At least, that is the display I am eventually going to make.

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Working on the top of the legs.

I carve them in a mirror image simultaneously on one rod of metal.

I am slightly dyslexic, so it takes a bit longer than normal to carve mirror images.

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Looking like a piece of shyte.

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The bottom part of the legs and feet.

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Then the arms and one flight control .

I had to make the flight control at the same time because I want one arm to be holding the joy stick and the other arm controlling the power as the fighter banks.

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Now for the new body.

I carve a blank in wax first.

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Then I sand cast the blank using the Delft Clay method.

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The blank after being cast.

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The pilot in his seat.

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Now I am going to make all the alien instruments for the cockpit that are needed to fly the Dragon Fighter.

 

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And here I am now.

The cockpit opens so that the interior can be seen more easily.

Friday, March 18, 2016

Using the Edinburgh Etch.

 

 

The edinburgh etch was invented by Friedhard Kiekeben and here is a bigger description of the process

Basically it consists of 4 parts ferric chloride solution and 1 part citric acid solution.

Using just ferric chloride, the etch is very slow and the residue has to be frequently brushed away for the etch to continue.

The addition of citric acid speeds up the bite of ferric chloride, and also removes the sediment that was left behind previously.

So you get a quick working solution with out having to call in the Hazmat team.

For myself, I just needed a quick process to etch a simple design on a brass foot plate for my latest fantasy creation I am building.

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The brass foot plate.

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First I trace out the outline and then with a HB pencil, I draw the outline of the shape I want.

I only draw one side.

I want to make a mirror image, so I fold the paper in half once the one side is finished.

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With the paper folded in half, I scribble on it using the back of the plastic marker shown.

This causes the pencil lead to transfer to the other side.

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Then I darken the image and clean it up on the left and then I use a copy machine to make a copy of the image.

I do this just so that if things go wrong I have the original still.

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Then I take the footplate and stick packing tape on both sides, making sure that the edges are also well covered.

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Then I use a clear glue to glue the paper to the tape on the foot plate.

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Once the glue is dry I use a scalpel blade to cut through the paper and the tape at the same time.

Then I peel the cut part off.

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Once the design is exposed, I pull the remains of the paper off as well.

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I mix up a small amount of ferric chloride and citric acid.

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This is a one off job so I throw the spent mordant away.

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I wasn't in a hurry so I left it in the solution for about 5 hours and that removed about a third of a millimeter from the surface.

Then I used a liver of sulfur to blacken and high light the recessed areas .

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I wanted the black not to be too dark.

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Inside the cabin.

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The edinburgh etch can also be used for finer applications.

Here is a picture of a very beautiful woman.

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The picture is then prepare in photo shop.

I made an action in photo shop for this sequence, so it is easy to do this for all photo's.

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The image is reversed and printed with a laser printer onto a sheet of PnP.

Then I used an iron to heat the laser printing up and transfer the image to the brass.

Then it is etched in the same manner as I described.

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I thought it came out quite nice.